Doosan Heavy now called Doosan Enerbility

By Jack Burke01 April 2022

Move approved by shareholders

Doosan Heavy Industries & Construction has officially changed its name to Doosan Enerbility after a vote by shareholders.

According to the company, “Enerbility” was coined by combining the words “energy” and “sustainability” as a portrayal of the company’s aspirations to enable the achievement of sustainability with the company’s energy technologies.

“The intent was to create a name that embodies the company’s core business values, one that expresses the company’s commitment to enriching people’s lives and making Earth a cleaner planet with its energy technologies,” the company said.

According to the company, it is now actively pursuing the gas turbine, hydrogen energy, offshore wind power and SMR businesses as its new growth drivers and is also actively expanding into new areas like 3D printing, digital technology and waste-to-energy(WtE) businesses.

This new name change comes after 21 years of using the current name “Doosan Heavy Industries & Construction,” the origin of which can be traced back to 2001 when the company, formerly known as Korea Heavy Industries & Construction, was renamed.

The company offers integrated solutions in the fields of power generation, energy and desalination plants in 40 countries around the world.

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